Interview with Paul Cavill from the English Place Names Society.

Please find below a link of a Audio broadcast by Paul Cavill from the English Place Names Society. The interview was conducted by Adrian Moss, director of Focus Business Communications who made the DVD of The Meon Valley – A journey of discovery.

http://www.focusbiz.co.uk/casebook/old-english-place-names-meon-valley-and-its-saxon-heritage/

Within the above link there are links to other online resources which you can use to further research place names data.

If you wish to go directly to the Nottingham University website you can investigate place names in other area’s, the website is continuously being updated to include additional data being added.

To further your knowledge then please click on the link below.

http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/ins/placenamesociety/index.aspx

The University of Nottingham is one of three universities (the others being Cambridge and Winchester) supporting the ‘Saxons in the Meon Valley’ programme.

We were very fortunate to be offered the research services of Dr Kelly Kilpatrick of the Institute of Name Studies at the University of Nottingham.

Kelly has undertaken and amazingly in-depth study of the place names in the Meon Valley and published her work in a report entitled: ‘Saxons in the Meon Valley: A Place-Name Survey’

The full report is available to download here – MeonValleyPlaceNameResearch_Sep2014.

Kelly and her colleague Dr Paul Cavill, also contributed to the making of our film  – ‘The Meon Valley – A Journey of Discovery’ (John insert a link to our home page which holds information on the film)

Paul was interviewed by Adrian Moss director of our film partner, Focus Business Communications; the interview is posted on the FocusBiz project blog –  http://www.focusbiz.co.uk/casebook/old-english-place-names-meon-valley-and-its-saxon-heritage/

Nottingham University’s Institute for NameStudies is the home of research into English place‑names and personal names. The English Place‑Name Society (EPNS) is the established national body for the subject; its offices and library are housed in the Institute. (For more information see http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/ins/index.aspx

Dr Kelly Kilpatrick who joined us for our AGM in April 2014, has a DPhil in Medieval History at the University of Oxford, specialising in early medieval British and Irish place-names.

Kelly’s toponymic (place name) research utilises interdisciplinary methodologies alongside traditional approaches to study the impact of migrations and religion on the place-names, landscapes and cultures of medieval Britain and Ireland. Kelly has published works on Celtic religious place-name elements and the role of place-names in an Irish hagiographical tradition, and has contributed short articles on Anglo-Saxon ecclesiastical architecture to Oxford University’s Woruldhord project (http://projects.oucs.ox.ac.uk/woruldhord). (The Friends of Corhampton Church has also contributed to Woruldhord – World Hoard)

In addition to Her work on place names in the Meon Valley, Kelly’s current research interests include: a detailed examination of the place-names in Y Gododdin, a comparative study on the role of place-names in Anglo-Saxon hagiography (specifically the Vita Sancti Guthlaci), and a project provisionally titled ‘Place-Names, Landscapes and Early Christian Identity in the Hebrides: The Maritime Geography of the Vita Sancti Columbae.’

Dr Paul Cavill,  has  many years’ experience in place-name scholarship, and has edited the English Place-Name County Survey volumes over the past two decades.

Paul has published several articles on the early traditions relating to Saint Edmund of East Anglia and is interested in,  and written books on, the history of early English Christianity (Anglo-Saxon Christianity, The Christian Tradition in Anglo-Saxon England), and the influence of Christianity on literature (‘The Christian Tradition in English Literature’). Paul has also published extensively on Maxims, Cædmon’s Hymn, The Battle of Maldon and other works.

Paul has extensive research experience in the general linguistic, cultural, historical and literary background of Anglo-Saxon England, and enjoy interdisciplinary approaches to the study of both texts and language.